Day 2: Jacob’s Well, Nablus Old City, Samaritan Village, Mount Gerizim

Continuing on Day 2 of Ecclesia Houston‘s Holy Land pilgrimage with Breaking Bread Journeys, we started our tour by making our way from Netanya to Nablus in the West Bank of the Palestinian Territories. Our first stop was to the Greek Orthodox Church that sits atop the three-millennia-old Jacob’s Well. Christianity has a longstanding connection with the site of the well, with various churches being constructed on the site since 384 AD. We tried to guess the depth of the well today, which prompted me to research the question. I found that based on a measurement made in 1935, the total depth of the well is 41 meters (135 ft).

Pastor Chris read to us from John’s Gospel 4:1-26, which describes the account of Jesus and the Samaritan woman who drew water for Jesus from this very well. In the passage Jesus tells the Samaritan woman of the living water that quenches our spiritual thirst forever. Jesus breaks accepted social barriers of the time by associating as a Jew with a Samaritan, and by associating publicly with a woman.

Jesus told the Samaritan woman, “Drink this water, and your thirst is quenched only for a moment. You must return to this well again and again. I offer water that will become a wellspring within you that gives life throughout eternity. You will never be thirsty again.”

We experienced the rare blessing to drink water from the same well mentioned in this Gospel passage – to quench our physical thirst – while on the very same site were reminded of that eternal spiritual wellspring deposited within us!

Next, we made our way into the old city of Nablus to visit an olive oil soap factory that’s been making hand-cut soap for 180 years. It has made Nablus famous throughout the middle east for its soap. We then toured more of the old city, visiting several street food vendors and a candy factory.

It never ceases to amaze me how extremely friendly the people of Nablus are to us foreigners. So often we heard, “Where are you from?” with us replying, “America” and them then saying, “Welcome, welcome.” We learned to say “salaam alaikum” which means “peace be with you” and “shukran” which means “thank you.” These two phrases carried us far with these kind people, as you could tell they were grateful for us visiting their city, and we were likewise humbled by their hospitality.

Next, we arrived at an event prepared by Slow Food Nablus, the culinary school for The House of Dignity which is an empowerment and education program for Palestinian women. The women of this community are incredibly joyful and were so happy to serve us. Our meal was an unbelievable feast we will not soon forget. At the lunch we were joined by a local Sufi Imam who shared with us his perspective on the Israeli-Palestinian tensions, what life is like in Nablus, and how he is working to try to influence youth to seek peaceful resolution to the tensions vs. violence or military struggle. He cited that over the past few decades it has become clear to him that military struggle creates only loss in their pursuit to see the freedoms they desire.

Part of the aim of this unique tour is to demonstrate the love of Jesus to all peoples of this diverse land as we enter in to their homes and neighborhoods to break bread and listen. I believe that part of loving like Jesus loves is to break the accepted social barriers as he did with the Samaritan woman, to go across those “borders” and listen with respect to those who are not like us. We will do that again later in the week as we tour Yad Vashem, the Jewish Holocaust Museum, and as we enter a Jewish home to break bread in a traditional Shabbat dinner. And we did it today by listening to our new friends in Nablus. In between these two book-end experiences, we will walk where Jesus walked and further consider his radical ways of love, with no better backdrop than to be among those who often feel hated and misunderstood.

Next we visited the Samaritan Museum on Mt. Gerizim and enjoyed a scenic overlook with stunning views of Nablus below. The Samaritan Priest explained to us much about the tiny minority Samaritan faith (essentially, an obscure sect of Judaism, although they would not describe it that way) and its ancient history in the region. We were reminded again of the account of the Samaritan woman, and of the Parable of the Good Samaritan. Jesus, when asked by the scholar who Jesus means by “your neighbor”, tells a story of a man attacked by robbers and left for dead. An apparently pious priest and a Levite pass by the wounded man, but a Samaritan stops to help the man recover. Jesus then asks, “Which of these three proved himself a neighbor to the man who had been mugged by the robbers?” The sholar answers, “The one who showed mercy to him.” And Jesus said simply, “Go and do likewise.”

I felt this day that Jesus was calling us to “go and do likewise” to show mercy in the simplest of ways, by showing up, accepting hospitality, and blessing strangers with the gift of listening. It’s a theme I’ve seen on these tours, and I think our presence represents Jesus well, while trying our best to stay ubiased and avoid politics, to diffuse the tension of the region with the love deposited within us, to be ambassadors of God’s peace in the most unlikely ways. I feel that this is part of the adventure God calls us to.

I hope you’ll enjoy my photos from the day, and hope they offer a representation of some facets of what we saw and experienced today. Thanks for following along!

Day 2: Jacob’s Well, Nablus Old City, Samaritan Village

Continuing on Day 2 of Ecclesia Houston‘s Holy Land pilgrimage with Breaking Bread Journeys, we started our tour by making our way from Netanya to Nablus in the West Bank of the Palestinian Territories. Our first stop was to the Greek Orthodox Church that sits atop the two-millennia-old Jacob’s Well. Next, we made our way into Nablus city to visit an olive oil soap factory that’s been making hand-cut soap for 180 years. It has made Nablus famous throughout the middle east for its soap. We then toured more of the old city, visiting several street food vendors and a candy factory. Next, we arrived at an event prepared by Slow Food Nablus, the culinary school for The House of Dignity which is an empowerment and education program for Palestinian women. The women of this community are incredibly joyful and were so happy to serve us. Our meal was an unbelievable feast we will not soon forget. Next up, we visited a Samaritan museum on Mt. Gerizim and enjoyed a scenic overlook with stunning views of Nablus below. This Samaritan Priest explained to us much about the Samaritan faith and its ancient history in the region. Such an amazing day. I am always touched by how welcoming the people of Nablus are. There’s a certain sense of tranquility over the city.

Day 2: Jacob’s Well, Nablus Old City, Samaritan Village

We started our tour by making our way from Tel Aviv to Nablus in the West Bank of the Palestinian Territories. Our first stop was to the Greek Orthodox Church that sits atop the two-millenia-old Jacob’s Well. Next, we made our way into Nablus city to visit an olive oil soap factory that’s been making hand-cut soap for 180 years. It has made Nablus famous throughout the middle east for its soap. Next, we arrived at an event prepared by Slow Food Nablus, the culinary school for The House of Dignity which is an empowerment and education program for Palestinian women. The women of this community are incredibly joyful and were so happy to serve us. Our meal was an unbelievable feast we will not soon forget. Next up, we visited a Samaritan museum on Mt. Gerizim. This Samaritan Priest explained to us much about the Samaritan faith and its deep history in the region. Such an amazing day. I am always touched by how welcoming the people of Nablus are. There’s a certain sense of tranquility over the city. 

Arrival Day + Day 1: Jacob’s Well, Nablus Old City, Samaritan Village

I’m happy to be able to document for my 7th group from Ecclesia Houston traveling with Breaking Bread Journeys! So that I don’t get behind, I’m in a bit of a rush to get this published. So for today, this will mainly be a photo post. Hope to do more writing in the days ahead!

First section: Catching you up from our arrival and free day in Tel Aviv before we got the tour kicked off today. We were blessed to hear from Christina Samara and Lisa Moed, co-owners of Breaking Bread Journeys. The beaches in Tel Aviv are beautiful. We are staying at a great hostel in Tel Aviv that has been very accommodating for our group.

Day 1 included our visit to the Church of Jacob’s Well, a tour of Nablus Old City, a 150-year-old soap factory, and a visit to a Women’s empowerment center called Slow Food Nablus where women are trained in cooking and catering skills. We ended the day with a quick but interesting visit to The Samaritan Museum.

Bonus section: some photos of the Old City Nablus markets shot with my Ricoh camera.

Day 3: Jacob’s Well, Nablus Old City, Samaritan Village, Har Bracha Winery

Today, after much-needed travel recovery in Netanya, our group from Ecclesia Houston kicked off the official tour with Breaking Bread Journeys.

It was an amazing day with new friends touring the holy land, meeting people of all imaginable backgrounds: Arab Christians, Arab Muslims, Sufis, Samaritan Jews, traditional Jews, settlers, winemakers, all kinds, all God’s people! Praying for peace and imagining a world without a need for borders. It seems impossible, but when you meet with them, break bread with all of them, see all their children smiling the same smiles, you start to realize it shouldn’t be so impossible— we are all the same.

Forgive the massive upload of so many photos in one post but in the interest of my limited time on the blog, I have erred on the side of inclusion when choosing photos to share. Not to mention this was a jam-packed day full of such a variety of activities and we have 43 pilgrims in this group—that’s a lot of photography subjects! Tap/click on any image for its standalone file if you wish to share.

We started our tour by making our way from Netanya to Nablus in the West Bank of the Palestinian Territories. Our first stop was to the Greek Orthodox Church that sits atop the two-millennia-old Jacob’s Well. I was pretty thrilled that they were actually allowing photos of the well today!

Pastor Chris read the passage from John’s Gospel, chapter 4, where Jesus encounters the Samaritan woman at this very well we visited. Jesus said to her, “Drink this water, and your thirst is quenched only for a moment. You must return to this well again and again. I offer water that will become a wellspring within you that gives life throughout eternity. You will never be thirsty again.” My prayer on this pilgrimage is that we all will find even deeper currents of this life-giving wellspring and that we would share the resulting light we experience with all we encounter on this journey. 

Next, we made our way into Nablus city to tour an olive oil soap factory that’s been making hand-cut soap for 180 years. It has made Nablus famous throughout the middle east for its soap.

We then began walking through the old city of Nablus to sample various snacks, spices, and sweets of the merchants. We were also invited to tour a famous Sufi mosque where were able to hear from the local Imam, a moderate Muslim who campaigns for peace. Our pastor is making plans for him to visit our church in Houston in the interest in inter-faith dialog and peace.

Next we arrived at an event prepared by Slow Food Nablus, the culinary school for The House of Dignity which is an empowerment and education program for Palestinian women. The women of this community are incredibly joyful and were so happy to serve us. Our meal was an unbelievable feast we will not soon forget. After the meal, I wandered around the dining hall to capture some more local street scenes. If you haven’t noticed, I have a slight obsession with doors.